Introducing - The Cyber Awareness - Online Gaming Presentation

cyber awareness - online gaming 

AVOID THE RISKS, REAP THE BENEFITS!

The Cyber Awareness - Online Gaming presentation provides  guardians, educators, youth support service providers  and  young people with the building blocks to establishing a healthy life balance that incorporates online gaming in a safe, beneficial and meaningful way.

The rapidly growing trend of online video gaming has led to a significant change in the way many young people interpret and connect with both themselves and the outside world. 

The online gaming world is a place where young people can look, behave and obtain in whatever way they want. It is a place where they can relax, receive instant gratification, socialize with their friends, gain status and escape from reality. They can be themselves within the digital world.

However, there is increasing evidence showing there are some substantial risks associated with online gaming. Many young people are spending several hours a day playing online games, exposing them to never before seen risks such as gaming disorder and online bullying, while potentially increasing the risks of addictive behaviours, including gambling.

All this is leading to a divide in understanding between parents and their young people, making it harder for many parents to support their children through difficult times.

The Cyber Awareness - Online Gaming presentation is here to bridge that gap.

 

WANT THE CYBER AWARENESS PRESENTATION DELIVERED AT YOUR SCHOOL, COMMUNITY CLUB OR WORKPLACE?

CONTACT US NOW VIA: INFO@EMPPATHWAYS.COM.AU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJ71KAO0mtc


Some of the stats

In 2017, 80% of all young people in Australia had played video games within the past 12 months, with 34% of them making in-game purchases and a further 17% experiencing in game bullying. (Office of the eSafety Commissioner 2018, p. 3).

Research suggests that up to 3% of people that start playing video games will go onto to suffer from gaming disorder (Pontes, Griffiths 2019), which is characterized by the World Health Organization (WHO 2018) as a pattern of impaired gaming behaviour, "of sufficient severity to result in significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning and would normally have been evident for at least 12 months". The disorder will be included in the 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) in 2022.

Research suggests that young people with mental health issues including addiction, depression and anxiety are more likely to develop an online gaming disorder (Hseih, et al 2019). 


According to the Interactive Games & Entertainment Association (IGEA) Australian Video Game Industry Snapshot (2018), in Australia the video game industry experienced a total growth of 25% in 2018, largely due to the rapid increase in digital sales, which went up by 39%, to $2.851 Billion.

This growth is expected to grow at an estimated compound rate of 37% annually for the next three years and is largely accredited to the success of mobile apps and in game purchases (IGEA 2018). These digital sales are driven by Fortnite, a game made for young people (IGEA 2018).  

Moreover, a further proposed risk of online gaming is that in-game purchases and micro transactions could potentially be exposing young people to gambling and, therefore, increasing the risk of the development of a gambling problem (King 2018).


the answer is not restriction:

Despite the substantial risks that can be associated with online gaming, the restriction of the act has not been advised by any bodies, including WHO (2018). This is based, in part, to the large amount of benefits that young people gain through online gaming.

Online gaming has been proven to support young people with improved personal, cognitive, professional and social outcomes (Brand et al. 2019).  Moreover, young people enjoy learning and engaging online (Kellet 2011). This provides youth support service providers with the opportunity to engage with young people meaningfully, while supporting them through a variety possible situations.

Online gaming is also proving to be of significant benefit to young people for educational purposes, increasing cultural understanding and creating career pathways (Brand et al. 2019).

While the vast majority of young gamers experience no ill effects, there are some concerning stats: 17% of young people experienced in-game bullying from the period of 2017-2018 and it is estimated that of all gamers 3% will go onto to develop a serious gaming disorder. All young people playing video online video games are at risk of pre-exposure to addictive, adult content, including gambling and graphic violence.

The good news is, most young people that enjoy spending their time gaming online aren’t heading towards bankruptcy, addictive behaviors and depression. In fact, the vast majority of young gamers will go on to lead perfectly normal adult lives… and they don’t have to stop gaming to achieve that.

In fact, using gaming as part of the foundation of a trusting and supportive parent/child relationship can be of significant benefit to all. 

 

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IT JUST TAKES THE RIGHT KNOWLEDGE AND KNOW-HOW AND THAT’S WHERE THE E.M.P. PATHWAYS: CYBER AWARENESS PRESENTATION CAN HELP.


FEATURES OF THE PRESENTATION INCLUDE: 

A wholistic overview of the risks and benefits of online gaming with onsite on establishing healthy gaming habits.

THE BENEFITS (AND HOW TO UTILIZE THEM):

o   Emotional 

o   Social

o   Cognitive

o   Strategic

o   Creative

o   Career pathways

THE RISKS (AND HOW TO AVOID THEM):

o   Cyber Bullying

o   Excessive gaming (gaming disorder)

o   Gambling Pre-exposure 

o   Effects of violent video games

o   Depression

o   Physical conditions

 

Get up to date on all the latest stats, technology and lingo, learn about all the major risks and benefits of online gaming. Find out what services are available if you think you or your young person is at risk of gaming disorder. Discover how the cyber world can be used to enhance social outcomes and career pathways.



Reference List

Kowert, R., Domahidi, E., & Quandt, T 2014, ‘The relationship between online video game involvement and gaming-related friendships among emotionally sensitive individuals’, Cyberpsychology, behavior and social networking, vol. 17, no. 7, pp. 447–453. doi:10.1089/cyber.2013.0656

Bassiouni, D & Hackley, C 2016, ‘Video Games and Young Children's Evolving Sense of Identity- A Qualitative Study’, Young Consumers. vol. 17, no. 10, 2016. doi: 10.1108/YC-08-2015-00551.

Encompass Family and Community, 2016, Youth Support Services Best Practice Guide, Third edition September 2016, Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services, Queensland.

Moensted, Maja 2018, ‘Youth programs' ability to meaningfully engage with marginalised young people's social citizenship aspirations’ [online]. Journal of Applied Youth Studies, vol. 2, no. 4, 2018: 44-56, viewed 27 January 2020, <https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=719318612992612;res=IELHSS> ISSN: 2204-9207

Office of the eSafety Commissioner 2018, State Of Play – Youth And Online Gaming In Australia,  Office of the eSafety Commissioner 2018, Australia, viewed 14 January 2020, https://www.esafety.gov.au/sites/default/files/2019-07/Youth-and-online-gaming-report-2018.pdf